Assignment One Tutor Feedback

I was extremely happy with my tutor feedback for my first assignment! I had put so much work into the first part of this course, and it was definitely well worth it! Here are some of my tutor’s comments;

Image #1

“Your model has a great natural smile and you have caught that really well in this first shot, the inclusion of a small part of the ruins on the left of the frame adds some visual interest as well as giving some context and contrast (old & young) to the image. Your Photoshop skills are good even at this early stage although the removal of skin blemishes is a subject that can raise many an interesting debate!” I agree with this comment- as some photographers feel strongly about not editing out things like skin blemishes. However, I look at it from the point of view of ‘if I was looking back at these photos, would I want to look spotty?’ probably not!

10 (2)

Image #2

“This is probably my favourite shot from the assignment and your pre-planning worked out very well, actually it reminds me of some of Ralph Meatyard’s images, a little bit moody and you’re not quite sure what the image actually means but you enjoy it all the same. Luke’s pose is good, he looks a little tense in some ways, but this fits well with the ivy frame and general location of the shot. The tonal range of the black and white conversion also works well, sometimes a colour photograph doesn’t always convert well to monochrome but here the balance between the highlights and shadow areas is pretty much spot on.” I loved this shot too, so I was over the moon with these comments! This was an example of me trying to be a little more arty with my photography- and I think it paid off!

13

My tutor made a couple of suggestions of ways I could improve my photography;

“Also why stick to f4.5? The optimum setting for 35mm cameras is f8-11. This is just an example of the things you can try to give your images a different feel.” This is a very good suggestion, as I feel that sometimes I do stick to wide apertures as I’m afraid of image blur if I use a smaller aperture with less light. I also love the blurred backgrounds large apertures create, so I have tended to stick with what I initially preferred! However, I’m definitely going to experiment with different apertures in future, to give my images a different feel as suggested.

“Also Luke’s gaze in all of the shots (that we can his face) is to the left, this needs a little more variation and at least one shot, possibly this final one, could have had him looking directly into the lens. This lack of connection with the viewer is quite important as we find it difficult to relate to the model in anyway, eye to eye contact is an important aspect of photography and I would try and bring this into your work in the future.” This is a fair comment. I always try to get shots of the subject not looking into the camera lens, as I am aiming for more ‘candid’ shots, which is the style I love! However, I think that experimenting with different styles is important, and this is something that I will definitely try.

27

 

Below is my tutor’s feedback in full;

Image #1

Your model has a great natural smile and you have caught that really well in this first shot, the inclusion of a small part of the ruins on the left of the frame adds some visual interest as well as giving some context and contrast (old & young) to the image. Your Photoshop skills are good even at this early stage although the removal of skin blemishes is a subject that can raise many an interesting debate!

Image #2

This is probably my favourite shot from the assignment and your pre-planning worked out very well, actually it reminds me of some of Ralph Meatyard’s images, a little bit moody and you’re not quite sure what the image actually means but you enjoy it all the same. Luke’s pose is good, he looks a little tense in some ways, but this fits well with the ivy frame and general location of the shot. The tonal range of the black and white conversion also works well, sometimes a colour photograph doesn’t always convert well to monochrome but here the balance between the highlights and shadow areas is pretty much spot on. I will say that the assessors don’t usually like to see a mix of colour and black & white in assignments, that’s because the two mediums have very different qualities and they rarely work well together. However, if you can explain in your notes a valid argument as to why you have used both mediums then that is fine with me.

Image #3

This shot seems ready made for a black & white conversion, the skin tones contrast well with the background and the iron railings and although I wasn’t too sure about this shot at first I think it comes across well and demonstrates good technical and visual skills. Luke’s expression is good, as though something has caught his interest and the cogs are turning.

Image #4

I can see how this image would work as a fashion styled one, the clothes are highlighted well against the interesting background and Luke has a kind of nonchalant look that again comes across well in the overall aesthetic of the image. You may want to think about a change of clothes or props in any future assignments and see how that can work for both the model and yourself.

Image #5

This image does have a good rhythm, there is an interesting connection between the wooden posts and Luke’s footsteps as he walks away, and although you could have possibly cloned out the archway that is visible to the left of the model’s head, the image works well.

Image #6

Although this shot is similar to the first one, the fact that you have moved back a bit means the whole image has a different feel. Compared to the first example, there is less intimacy and the shot appears more like a styled catalogue shot, that’s not a bad thing as it is a good skill to have for the ‘bread and butter’ side of photography. You have probably also learned quite a lot from the comparison of the two images so it was more than worth the inclusion in the assignment.

Image #7

This final shot seems a little too forced, I am sure that wasn’t the case but Luke’s expression seems unnatural and out of sync with the rest of the images. Also Luke’s gaze in all of the shots (that we can his face) is to the left, this needs a little more variation and at least one shot, possibly this final one, could have had him looking directly into the lens. This lack of connection with the viewer is quite important as we find it difficult to relate to the model in anyway, eye to eye contact is an important aspect of photography and I would try and bring this into your work in the future.

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